Necrotizing Enterocolitis


Necrotizing Enterocolitis

Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is the most common gastrointestinal (GI) medical/surgical emergency occurring in newborn. An acute inflammatory disease with a multifactorial and controversial etiology, the condition is characterized by variable damage to the intestinal tract ranging from mucosal injury to full-thickness necrosis and perforation.

Necrotizing enterocolitis represents a significant clinical problem and affects close to 10% of infants who weigh less than 1500 g, with mortality rates of 50% or more depending on severity. Although it is more common in premature infants, it can also be observed in term and near-term babies.

NEC typically occurs in the second to third week of life in the infant who is premature and has been formula fed. Although various clinical and radiographic signs and symptoms are used to make the diagnosis, the classic clinical triad consists of abdominal distension, bloody stools, and pneumatosis intestinalis. Occasionally, signs and symptoms include temperature instability, lethargy, or other nonspecific findings of sepsis.

Those with a higher risk for this condition include:

  • Premature infants
  • Infants who are fed concentrated formulas
  • Infants in a nursery where an outbreak has occurred

Infants who have received blood exchange transfusions

Symptoms

  • Symptoms may come on slowly or suddenly, and may include:

    Exams and Tests

    Treatment

    In an infant suspected of having necrotizing enterocolitis, feedings are stopped and gas is relieved from the bowel by inserting a small tube into the stomach. Intravenous fluid replaces formula or breast milk. Antibiotic therapy is started. The infant’s condition is monitored with abdominal x-rays, blood tests, and blood gases.

    Surgery will be needed if there is a hole in the intestines or peritonitis (inflammation of the abdominal wall). The dead bowel tissue is removed and a colostomy or ileostomy is performed. The bowel is then reconnected several weeks or months later when the infection and inflammation have healed.

    Outlook (Prognosis)

    Necrotizing enterocolitis is a serious disease with a death rate approaching 25%. Early, aggressive treatment helps improve the outcome.

    Possible Complications

    When to Contact a Medical Professional

    If any symptoms of necrotizing enterocolitis develop, especially in an infant that has recently been hospitalized for illness or prematurity, go to the emergency room

 

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